Home > Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby Public Programs

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 Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby
October 13, 2018–March 17, 2019
 
 
 
EXHIBITION DETAILS
Through Sunday, March 17, 2019

Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby will mark the first museum solo exhibition of Devan Shimoyama, Philadelphia-born painter and professor at Carnegie Mellon University. Spanning his burgeoning career, this exhibition includes painting, photography, and sculpture, and a series of new works that will be on view for the first time. His work challenges cliché with daring and personal representations of the complexities of race and sexuality. In his recent barbershop paintings, Shimoyama transforms the hyper-masculine social space into queer fantasy where feminine glamour and fashion take over, and tender depictions of boys don floral capes and glitter-encrusted hair.

Shimoyama creates two distinct worlds—one an enchanted paradise, the other a queer imagining of the African American barbershop. Celebrated for fraternity and community, Shimoyama presents the barbershop as a space where young men and boys can feel shamed and vulnerable. In sculpture, he creates objects of mourning for Trayvon Martin and Tamir Rice, both examples of the aggressive targeting of African American youth as fearful or threatening. While canvases feel joyful and celebratory, they also present commentary on pain and sorrow. Teardrops lurk in the background of his landscapes or stream down the faces of his figures as a reminder of the racial injustices at work in contemporary society. Shimoyama presents a world where race, sexuality, and identity can operate from a point of freedom generated by inner strength.

This exhibition makes a unique connection to The Andy Warhol Museum’s permanent collection and brings to light contemporary insight into one of Warhol’s largest and yet most overlooked painting commissions, the Ladies and Gentlemen series of 1974-75. Visitors will find Shimoyama’s work in dialog with Warhol’s portraits of drag queens on the fourth floor of the museum’s permanent collection. Shimoyama’s confident and daring depictions of sexuality, race and queer performance help reclaim the agency and visibility that Warhol’s models have been denied and bring these paintings out from the shadows.

Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby is curated by Jessica Beck, The Milton Fine Curator of Art at The Andy Warhol Museum. The exhibition will be accompanied by an illustrated catalogue with essays by Jessica Beck, Alex Fialho, and Rickey Laurentiis and interview by Emily Colucci with the artist.

Generous support of Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby is provided by the Quentin and Evelyn T. Cunningham Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation, The Fine Foundation, Arts, Equity, & Education Fund, Karen and Jim Johnson, De Buck Gallery, Jim Spencer and Michael Lin, with additional support from Stacy and Samuel Freeman, V. Joy Simmons M.D., Mrs. Ellen and Mr. Jack Kessler, The Plastino Family Charitable Fund, and Mr. Howard C. Eglit.


Devan Shimoyama, Tasha, 2018, Courtesy of the artist
 
 
Generous support of Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby is provided by the Quentin and Evelyn T. Cunningham Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation, The Fine Foundation, Arts, Equity, & Education Fund, Karen and Jim Johnson, De Buck Gallery, Jim Spencer and Michael Lin, with additional support from Stacy and Samuel Freeman, V. Joy Simmons M.D., Mrs. Ellen and Mr. Jack Kessler, The Plastino Family Charitable Fund, and Mr. Howard C. Eglit.

Exhibition-Related Programs
The exhibition programming is expansive and dynamic including community partnerships, artist residencies with Rashaad Newsome and Kleaver Cruz, poetry readings, dance parties and dialogue with the community.

“The programming for Cry, Baby was designed to be diverse and inclusive and offer different platforms for celebration and important dialogue,” says Jessica Beck, Milton Fine curator of art. From academic settings to the barbershop, the events and public programs offer a comprehensive overview of the major themes of the exhibition: agency, racial violence, uplift, and beauty.”

 


 
(Rashaad Newsome, photo by Seth Caplan)
 
Rashaad Newsome: Shade Compositions
Wednesday, December 12, 2018
8 p.m.
Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland)
Rashaad Newsome, renowned New York based artist, will make his Pittsburgh debut of Shade Compositions, an ongoing performance project that launched in 2005. Throughout the Fall of 2018, Newsome will be working in Pittsburgh, casting local performers, and staging rehearsals for Shade Compositions, the artist’s critically acclaimed performance. In this performance, Newsome is both conductor, composer and vocal choreographer. Leading an ensemble of locally cast self-identifying black female and femme performers, whose individual voices and gestures are synthesized to form improvisatory orchestral music. Newsome explores the complexities of social power structures and questions of agency.

During the performance, Newsome collages video and audio using hacked video game controllers. For over a decade Newsome has engaged in casual, but extensive ethnographic and linguistic research into global iterations of “Black Vernacular”—a variety of English natively spoken by most working and middle-class African Americans, particularly in urban communities. Through his visually engaging and dynamic style of live performance and video, Newsome explores the complexities of social power structures and questions of agency.

This event is organized by Jessica Beck, The Warhol’s Milton Fine curator of art in conjunction with the exhibition Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby.

Rashaad Newsome was born in 1979 in New Orleans, and lives and works in New York City. He has exhibited and performed in galleries, museums, institutions, and festivals throughout the world including: Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans, The Whitney Museum, The Studio Museum in Harlem, Brooklyn Museum, MoMAPS1, SFMOMA, New Orleans Museum of Art, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France, The Garage Center for Contemporary Culture, Moscow, Russia, and MUSA, Vienna, Austria, and the recently inaugurated National Museum of African American History and Culture. Newsome’s work is in public collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Brooklyn Museum of Art, The SFMOMA, The Studio Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and The McNay Art Museum of San Antonio. In 2010 he participated in the Whitney Biennial, and in 2011 in Greater New York at MoMAPS1.
Free; Registration is suggested; Visit warhol.org

The Artist Up Close: Devan Shimoyama
Thursday, March 14, 2019
7 p.m.
The Warhol theater
Catalogue contributors, Jessica Beck, Emily Colucci, Alex Fialho, and Rickey Laurentiis, talk with Devan Shimoyama about his work and practice. This event serves as a closing dialogue for the exhibition, Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby, and offers a chance for the community to respond and meet the artist. Shimoyama and authors will be available to sign copies of the exhibition catalogue, which will be for sale in The Warhol Store.

Jessica Beck is the Milton Fine curator of art at The Andy Warhol Museum. She curated the Devan Shimoyama: Cry, Baby exhibition.

Emily Colucci is a writer, curator, and co-founder of Filthy Dreams, an art blog for which she received an Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant in 2016. Colucci has contributed to publications and magazines including VICE, Salon, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Art Papers, Art F City and others. In 2017, she curated Night Fever at Future Tenant in Pittsburgh and in 2015, she co-curated Visual AIDS’s annual exhibition, Party Out Of Bounds: Nightlife As Activism Since 1980 at LaMaMa Galleria in New York, and its satellite exhibition, Courtship Disorder.

Alex Fialho is a curator and arts writer based in New York. He is a frequent contributor to Artforum, and the Programs Director for Visual AIDS. Together with Melissa Levin, Fialho manages The Michael Richards Estate and has curated multiple exhibitions stewarding the legacy of Richards’ art and life. Fialho has conducted extensive oral histories as part of the Smithsonian Archives of American Art’s Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic Oral History Project.

Poet Rickey Laurentiis is the author of Boy with Thorn (2015). Laurentiis is the winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize, the Levis Reading Prize, and was a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. His other honors include fellowships from the Whiting Foundation, the Lannan Literary Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, and the Poetry Foundation. His poem, “Visible City,” was featured in the exhibition catalogue for Prospect.3 New Orleans. Laurentiis is currently the inaugural Fellow in Creative Writing at the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics at the University of Pittsburgh.
 
 

Free; Registration is suggested; Visit warhol.org

 

 

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