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Meet the people who marched in solidarity across Pittsburgh and D.C.

 

Beatrice Alba, 10, of Point Breeze: "I am here because I don't agree with the current president and because I want to stand up for people not being treated fairly." (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Beatrice Alba, 10, of Point Breeze: "I am here because I don't agree with the current president and because I want to stand up for people not being treated fairly." (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

 

Women’s March events drew large crowds Saturday across the world and across the United States.

Pittsburgh was no exception. Some Pittsburghers, like Nancy Washington and Rosemary Trump headed to Washington, D.C., to join the Women’s March in the nation’s capital. Thousands marched here, in Pittsburgh, in two separate marches: the Women’s March on Pittsburgh downtown and the other in the East End hailed the Our Feminism Must Be Intersectional Rally March. PublicSource had reporters in D.C. and at the two marches in Pittsburgh. Below are the stories and faces of people we met.

Click on images to display

Pittsburgh

Henry Nasser on shoulders of his father, Af, with mother, Danielle, and brother Silas. "We believe everyone deserves basic human rights," Danielle said. The family came Downtown Pittsburgh Saturday morning for the Women's March. (Photo by Natasha Khan/PublicSource)

Af Nasser, holding his son on his shoulders, poses for a photo with his wife, Danielle, and their other son. “We believe everyone deserves basic human rights,” Danielle said. The family came Downtown Pittsburgh Saturday morning for the Women’s March on Pittsburgh. (Photo by Natasha Khan/PublicSource)

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More than 1,000 people turned out to support the intersectional march held in East Liberty on Saturday, Jan. 21. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Nicole Roush, of Highland Park: "Feminism needs to be inclusive." (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Nicole Roush, of Highland Park, at the Our Feminism Must Be Intersectional Rally March in East Liberty: “Feminism needs to be inclusive.” (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Juliette Elbaum, of Garfield: “I believe in knocking down homophobia, ableism, racism, sexism, ageism, etc., and it gives me great hope to be in a crowd of my peers working towards a common goal.” (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Dozens of people gathered near Penn Plaza apartments, ready to march in the "Our Feminism must be Intersectional" March Saturday morning in East Liberty. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Dozens of people gathered near Penn Plaza apartments, ready to march in the Our Feminism Must Be Intersectional March Saturday morning in East Liberty. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Alona Williams, one of the organizers for the intersectional march held in East Liberty, leads the crowd of over 1,000 down Penn Avenue on Saturday, Jan.21. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

 (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Dozens of people marched with signs at the intersectional march in East Liberty (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Vanessa Kristoff, of Southside, at the Our Feminism Must Be Intersectional Rally March in East Liberty: "I'm an ally, supporting people of color." (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Vanessa Kristoff, of Southside, at the Our Feminism Must Be Intersectional Rally March in East Liberty: “I’m an ally, supporting people of color.” (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Celeste Scott, one of the organizers for the Women's March held in East Liberty, leads the crowd of over 1,000 on Highland Ave. Saturday, January 21, 2017.More than 1,000 people turned out to support the intersectional march held in East Liberty on Saturday, January, 21, 2017. The march was created in response to what the organizers called a lack of diversity and inclusion in the organization of the Women's March being held Downtown Pittsburgh at the same time. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Celeste Scott, one of the organizers for the intersectional march held in East Liberty, leads the crowd of over 1,000 on Highland Ave. Saturday. More than 1,000 people turned out to support the intersectional march held in East Liberty on Saturday, Jan. 21. The march was organized in response to what the organizers called a lack of diversity and inclusion in the organization of the Women’s March being held Downtown Pittsburgh at the same time. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Hunter Paulson, of Garfield: "The community that has come together today is beautiful and gives me hope." (Photo by Maranie Staab/PublicSource)

Hunter Paulson, of Garfield, at the Our Feminism Must Be Intersectional Rally March in East Liberty: “The community that has come together today is beautiful and gives me hope.” (Photo by Maranie Staab/PublicSource)

Courtney McNary, right, teacher at the Pittsburgh Public Schools, "It's important... to show my students to stand up for what you believe in." Olivia D'Mato (left) said she marched today because she doesn't believe in what Trump stands for. (Photo by Natasha Khan/PublicSource)

Courtney McNary (right) teacher at the Pittsburgh Public Schools, “It’s important… to show my students to stand up for what you believe in.” Olivia D’Mato (left) said she marched downtown today at the Women’s March on Pittsburgh because she doesn’t believe in what Trump stands for. (Photo by Natasha Khan/PublicSource)

Lynette Lewis, of East Liberty, when asked why she decided to march at the intersectional march instead of the one downtown, she said she wanted to march in East Liberty because she had witnessed displacement firsthand here: “I had friends who lived in Penn Plaza and were kicked out. I was there to witness their pain.” (Photos by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Lynette Lewis, of East Liberty, when asked why she decided to march at the intersectional march instead of the one downtown, she said she wanted to march in East Liberty because she had witnessed displacement firsthand here: “I had friends who lived in Penn Plaza and were kicked out. I was there to witness their pain.” (Photos by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Alisa Grisham from Uptown said, "Disability rights are civil rights... too often unrepresented in feminist dialogue." (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Alisa Grisham from Uptown said, “Disability rights are civil rights… too often unrepresented in feminist dialogue,” today at the Our Feminism Must Be Intersectional Rally March in East Liberty. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

"Faith in Fact and Reason" (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

“Faith in Fact and Reason.” (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Njaimeh Njie, who occasionally works with PublicSource, and Melinda Quinerly, both of Stanton Heights at the intersectional march in East Liberty: "We are here to witness and be a part of unity." (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Njaimeh Njie, who occasionally works with PublicSource, and Melinda Quinerly, both of Stanton Heights at the intersectional march in East Liberty: “We are here to witness and be a part of unity.” (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Oceana, of Highland Park,"I made this sign myself."

Oceana, of Highland Park, at the intersectional march in East Liberty said, “I made this sign myself.”

Vicki Hoskins, of Bloomfield, and Shelby Brewster, Lawrenceville, participate in the intersectional march in East Liberty. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Vicki Hoskins, of Bloomfield, and Shelby Brewster, who both live in Lawrenceville, participate in the intersectional march in East Liberty. (Photo by Maranie Staab for PublicSource)

Washington D.C.

At 3:15 a.m. this morning a bus left from a location near Monroeville Mall and headed to Washington, D.C. for the Women's March on Washington. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

At 3:15 a.m. this morning a bus left from a location near Monroeville Mall and headed to Washington, D.C. for the Women’s March on Washington. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Clyde Hopkins during a break in Hagerstown, MD, at 6:40 a.m. He told her he has been driving for 15 years. Lots of destinations, including numerous rallies in D.C. As for this trip, he was surprised there were a couple men on his bus. "It is inspiring to me. If you can get something done. It is worth it. And that what I hope happens." (Photo by Martha Rian for PublicSource)

Clyde Hopkins during a break in Hagerstown, MD, at 6:40 a.m. He told her he has been driving for 15 years. Lots of destinations, including numerous rallies in D.C. As for this trip, he was surprised there were a couple men on his bus. “It is inspiring to me. If you can get something done. It is worth it. And that what I hope happens.” (Photo by Martha Rian for PublicSource)

Allie, 25, with her mother, Meg Bernard, 60, of Squirrel Hill in Washington, D.C. for #WomensMarchonWashington. "This is is historic time in our country and we need to stand together as women and family and Americans. It means a lot to do it with my daughter," Meg said. Allie added: "We are a big family of strong women." (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Allie, 25, with her mother, Meg Bernard, 60, of Squirrel Hill in Washington, D.C. for #WomensMarchonWashington. “This is is historic time in our country and we need to stand together as women and family and Americans. It means a lot to do it with my daughter,” Meg said. Allie added: “We are a big family of strong women.” (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Rosemary Trump, 72, of Southside, now retired, was the first female organizer for the Service Employees International Union. "Sharing a last name with the president is a burden." Every time she uses her credit card, she gets the same: "Are you related?" Rosemary traveled from Pittsburgh to join the Women's March on Washington to "keep our civil rights and advance them, especially the right to assemble. If we don't, they could go away. Labor rights are human rights," she said. "If you care about humanity, you need to be here." (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Rosemary Trump, 72, of Southside, now retired, was the first female organizer for the Service Employees International Union. “Sharing a last name with the president is a burden.” Every time she uses her credit card, she gets the same: “Are you related?” Rosemary traveled from Pittsburgh to join the Women’s March on Washington to “keep our civil rights and advance them, especially the right to assemble. If we don’t, they could go away. Labor rights are human rights,” she said. “If you care about humanity, you need to be here.” (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

These Pittsburgh women marched in the Women's March on Washington. From left: Amy Lind, 24, who Shadyside; Amber Chaudhry, 24 also from Shadyside and Elisa Portillo, 25 , lives in Squirrel Hill.

These Pittsburgh women marched in the Women’s March on Washington. From left: Amy Lind, 24, who lives in Shadyside; Amber Chaudhry, 24, also lives in Shadyside and Elisa Portillo, 25, if from Squirrel Hill. (Photo by Martha Rial/PublicSource)

Marc Mancini, 30, of South Park , marched in D.C. and said, "I feel energized. The largest demonstration I have ever done. It is uplifting. This many people showed the new president and the world that we are making progress and we are not going backwards. It is all connected. I loved all the homemade signs."

Marc Mancini, 30, of South Park , marched in D.C. and said, “I feel energized. The largest demonstration I have ever done. It is uplifting. This many people showed the new president and the world that we are making progress and we are not going backwards. It is all connected. I loved all the homemade signs.” (Photo by Martha Rial/PublicSource)

Marchers flood Pennsylvania Avenue during the Women's March on Washington in Washington D.C. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Marchers flood Pennsylvania Avenue during the Women’s March on Washington in Washington D.C. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Marcher head towards The White House during Women's March on Washington in Washington D.C. A Trump supporter uses her hands to send a message during the Women's March on Washington in Washington D.C. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Marcher head towards The White House during Women’s March on Washington in Washington D.C. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Protestors wearing pussy hats embrace near the new Trump International Hotel during Women's March on Washington in Washington D.C. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

Protestors wearing pussy hats embrace near the new Trump International Hotel during Women’s March on Washington in Washington D.C. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

A Trump supporter uses her hands to send a message during the Women's March on Washington in Washington D.C. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

A Trump supporter uses her hands to send a message during the Women’s March on Washington in Washington D.C. (Photo by Martha Rial for PublicSource)

 

 

 

 

 

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